Main
Entries 1-5 of 218
1 2 3 4 5 ... 44 | Next
May 05

Viverant...Everyday Awesome

As I work to reestablish our Viverant Blog Posting, I started considering options for a great "kick-off" blog that is interesting, yet provides value to our readers ("reader value" will be the focus of most if not all of our blogs!!). I thought of talking about our thriving eVolution Program, or our new C.P.T. Program, or Dry Needling, or announcing our new Eagan clinic (hint hint). The Viverant Team was great at also providing ideas on what they thought would be a great first blog.

 

Then, the other day, I was sitting with Margi Heie, one of our "PT Pioneers" and Director of Internal Development at Viverant. She mentioned a conversation she had the other day and suddenly...BAM...I had my first blog. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did when I first heard her tell it:

 

"I was recently chatting with a co-worker who is in our business office (ie, not a healthcare professional).  In our conversation, I realized that we do some pretty amazing things here at Viverant (duh, right?).  However, we don’t really think anything different about it.  We have so many phenomenal physical therapists, PT assistants, dieticians, office managers, and “behind the scene” folks that just do what they do everyday without much of a thought.  It’s the culture of going above and beyond.  I like to call it “everyday awesome.”

 

In my role at Viverant as the Director of Internal Development, I have the luxury of going to all of our clinics and seeing what I am now coining as “everyday awesome” firsthand.  I hear so many stories of patients that have tried other treatments without success, and thought they had to "live with the pain".  I have seen the tears of joy when we help them, and see the sense of pride in my colleagues' faces when that happens.  

 

We have experts in multiple areas of musculoskeletal system, which is pretty cool.  We have the ability to reach so many people and change their lives with every treatment and special program we’ve created.   We have changed so many lives for the better, which means everything to our patients.  To us, we see it as just. . . everyday. . . awesome!"

 

Nov 02

Why Your Core Strength Really Matters

Every day, we’re surrounded by photos of six-pack abs and flat stomachs, and magazines seem to have an endless parade of articles on “beat belly flab” and “bikini-ready abs.” But while it might be nice to have an aesthetically pleasing midsection, your core is about much more than looks.

Core strength helps you in significant ways, every day and in nearly every movement. It’s at the center of how you reach, stretch, lift, and bend. Without adequate core strength, timing and coordination, you may be putting your body at risk for pain and chronic problems.

Also important to note is that your “core” isn’t just your abs. Although they’re in the mix, your core also includes your pelvis, lower back, and even your diaphragm, which is a sheet of internal muscle that’s important for respiration.

When you build appropriate strength throughout your core, it creates significant benefits:

Injury prevention: When you can move efficiently, it doesn’t load up one part of your body or cause certain muscles to take all the weight. Your back, shoulders, and knees aren’t being overtaxed just because your core lacks stability and strength.

Stronger back: There is so much back pain these days that it’s been called an epidemic. Apart from headaches, back pain is the leading cause of missed work days. Plus, there’s a ripple effect as the pain lowers your energy levels, disrupts sleep, affects mood and causes other problems. With a stronger, smarter core, you have a much lower risk of chronic back pain.

Better balance: As we age, there are many factors that affect balance, including eye and ear issues, medication side effects, joint health, and perceptual challenges. When balance is decreased, it can cause fall risk and other serious problems. But training the core can help to address these challenges and keep you on track as you age.  

One of the best ways to increase core strength is through Pilates, which focuses on core stabilization and control in order to prevent injury and optimize function. To achieve these outcomes, Viverant has developed eVolution℠, a distinctive system that combines Pilates and physical therapy to harness the best of each.

For more information on eVolution, contact us to set up an assessment and consultation.

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment. 
Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Oct 31

The Glutorial: Reversing the Damage of Gluteal Amnesia

Did you know the average adult is sedentary for 64% of the time they are awake? All that sitting can lead to gluteal amnesia which is when your body forgets how to activate the gluteal muscles properly. Want to know if you have gluteal amnesia and learn some exercises to reverse it? Download The Glutorial below! 


Oct 28

Are You Doing Pilates Wrong?

Pilates is one of the most powerful and effective ways to speed injury recovery, reduce the risk of chronic issues, and optimize performance—but only if you’re doing Pilates correctly. 

The technique focuses on controlled movements that build strength and balance through better alignment and proper core integration, which is one of the reasons it’s become so popular. There are plenty of Pilates DVDs, YouTube videos, group classes, and hybrid approaches (like PiYo, which combines Pilates and yoga) and it’s likely to remain in demand for years to come.

But Pilates is not like Zumba, where you can just follow along and do fairly well by mimicking a series of movements. The practice has a significant amount of nuance that requires extensive training for teachers and other practitioners. Here are three ways that people tend to do Pilates incorrectly:

Improper stabilization: In Pilates, core stability is key, and bringing stabilization to your center allows for movements that are effective and connected. If you’re not sure how to stabilize properly, you risk putting strain on your back, neck, and other joints.

Lack of control: One of the biggest aspects of Pilates is slow, controlled movements that allow you to feel what’s happening in your body. Often times people rush through the movements using momentum instead of precise, consciously-controlled movement, causing them to miss the benefit of Pilates. When that happens, you don’t get the control you need for proper form.

Selective implementation: Pilates is a system that’s designed to bring your whole body into alignment, allowing your natural strength and flexibility to be fully accessed. When you choose just one or two “exercises” from the Pilates system, you’re reducing the impact that a whole series can bring. Even worse, you may be improperly focusing on just one part of your body at the expense of another area, missing an opportunity to correct what's wrong.

When these problems begin, it can have the opposite effect of what you’re seeking—instead of getting stronger and more efficient, you risk injury and could be setting yourself up for long-term negative outcomes. 

Making sure that you’re following the detailed instructions of someone trained in both Pilates and the body’s movement patterns is hugely useful, and can have considerable benefits for your health, now and into the future.

To offer clients more meaningful outcomes in injury recovery, performance optimization, and injury prevention, Viverant has developed eVolution, a distinctive system that combines Pilates and physical therapy to harness the best of each.

For more information on eVolution, contact us to set up an assessment and consultation.


Oct 26

How Likely Are You to Experience an Achilles Tendon Injury?

Behind ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis is ranked third as the most common complaint among athletes. Achilles tendon tears and ruptures are also becoming more frequent among athletes, weekend warriors and the elderly. The Achilles tendon is one of the longest tendons in the body, it attaches to the calf muscles and extends down to the heel bone, it is used for almost all physical activity. Achilles tendonitis, tears, ruptures and other Achilles-related injuries can be caused by several different factors.

  • Sports-related movements: The Achilles tendon can hold almost 12.5 times an individuals body weight while running.  Jumping, running, and pivoting all put stress on your Achilles tendon. These repetitive high impact movements create overuse in the tendon, causing it to weaken.
  • Muscle tightness: Not being properly warmed up increases the chance of Achilles tendon injuries. Tight calf muscles can put excess stress on the tendon.
  • Pronation: Overpronation (the inward turn of the feet) when running or walking can also lead to Achilles-related injuries. Overpronation causes your arches to collapse adding stress to the Achilles tendon and surrounding muscles. 
  • Change in training: Achilles tendon injuries often occur with weekend warriors because the calf muscles are too weak to support the Achilles tendon. Jumping into a high intensity activity without proper training can increase the likelihood of injury.
  • Age: The elderly are often susceptible to Achilles related injuries due to reduced blood supply to the area and overall weakening of years of use. 

Here are our quick tips to reduce the chance of an Achilles tendon injury:

  1. Maintain good lower extremity and calf flexibility, stretch regularly
  2. Progress gradually into exercise or an activity, too much too soon could lead to injury
  3. Wear the proper shoe wear (link to gait analysis blog) for your foot type especially during exercise or athletics
  4. Warm up before activity and cool down after activity including post workout stretching

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment. 
Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Entries 1-5 of 218
1 2 3 4 5 ... 44 | Next