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Oct 26

How Likely Are You to Experience an Achilles Tendon Injury?

Behind ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis is ranked third as the most common complaint among athletes. Achilles tendon tears and ruptures are also becoming more frequent among athletes, weekend warriors and the elderly. The Achilles tendon is one of the longest tendons in the body, it attaches to the calf muscles and extends down to the heel bone, it is used for almost all physical activity. Achilles tendonitis, tears, ruptures and other Achilles-related injuries can be caused by several different factors.

  • Sports-related movements: The Achilles tendon can hold almost 12.5 times an individuals body weight while running.  Jumping, running, and pivoting all put stress on your Achilles tendon. These repetitive high impact movements create overuse in the tendon, causing it to weaken.
  • Muscle tightness: Not being properly warmed up increases the chance of Achilles tendon injuries. Tight calf muscles can put excess stress on the tendon.
  • Pronation: Overpronation (the inward turn of the feet) when running or walking can also lead to Achilles-related injuries. Overpronation causes your arches to collapse adding stress to the Achilles tendon and surrounding muscles. 
  • Change in training: Achilles tendon injuries often occur with weekend warriors because the calf muscles are too weak to support the Achilles tendon. Jumping into a high intensity activity without proper training can increase the likelihood of injury.
  • Age: The elderly are often susceptible to Achilles related injuries due to reduced blood supply to the area and overall weakening of years of use. 

Here are our quick tips to reduce the chance of an Achilles tendon injury:

  1. Maintain good lower extremity and calf flexibility, stretch regularly
  2. Progress gradually into exercise or an activity, too much too soon could lead to injury
  3. Wear the proper shoe wear (link to gait analysis blog) for your foot type especially during exercise or athletics
  4. Warm up before activity and cool down after activity including post workout stretching

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment. 
Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Oct 24

What's Your CoreScore?

To offer clients more meaningful outcomes in injury recovery, performance optimization, and injury prevention, Viverant has developed eVolution℠, a distinctive system that combines Pilates and physical therapy to harness the best of each.

Although each client will have specific goals and a tailored treatment plan, every eVolution track begins the same way: with a CoreScore℠ assessment. 

The CoreScore gives us an idea of how you use your body during everyday tasks and exercises, including how you integrate your glutes, core, and trunk muscles into movements. 

This isn’t a fitness test—don’t fear a return of those old middle-school gym days of crunches and pull-ups. Instead, the CoreScore consists of 10 whole-body exercises where the physical therapist will assess your performance of these exercises. Your outcome on each exercise is used as a powerful teaching tool to start to correct and restore healthy movement patterns.

The CoreScore will be retaken after every 6th visit in order to show you your progress and to continue to tailor your eVolution treatment for maximum benefit. Many clients gain significant insight from just their first CoreScore assessment, and they’re able to better grasp how weakness in one part of the body—particularly in their core muscles—may be leading to difficulties in other areas.

Although the CoreScore is considered a starting point, it’s a powerful kickoff to a results-oriented system. By knowing where you are now, you can understand where you have to go, and what it will take to get there.

For more information on eVolution, contact us to set up an assessment and consultation.

Want a free CoreScore assessment? Download our eVolution whitepaper and you'll find a free CoreScore voucher inside!

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment. 
Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Oct 21

Ask PT Pete: Lifting Weights with Knee Replacements

Dear PT Pete, 

I have knee replacements in both legs and scar tissue in one knee. My replacements are sound. I want to lift heavier weights at the gym to retain my muscle mass, but don't know if the downside of heavy leg lifting would wear my knee replacements out early. I am in my 60’s very fit and have lifted for 30+ years. Can I lift heavy?
- Jo from Boise

Thanks Jo! It is very important to keep up with good muscle tone and strength for the health of your knees, but that can be accomplished without having to lift heavy weights. Lifting too heavy can put unwanted stress on your knees and other joints. Ideally, weight lifting with a goal of 10-15 reps until fatigue is safe. The high-intensity, low repetition max approach is not ideal for any joint on your body after a certain age.  Please consult with your surgeon if you want to know the specific weight limit for your lifting program. As with 

Pete Garber is Viverant's co-founder and resident Physical Therapist. What questions do you have for PT Pete? 

Ask them here   

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment. 
Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Oct 20

How Pilates-infused Physical Therapy is Changing the Focus of Treatment [Infographic]

Our newest system, eVolution, is changing the focus of treatment by infusing the best of Pilates and physical therapy together. This powerful combination's goal is to address, eliminate and prevent deficiencies limiting your body from reaching its maximum physical potential. 

For a simple guide to how eVolution works and the benefits eVolution offers, download our infographic below.

DOWNLOAD INFOGRAPHIC


Oct 17

Phases of eVolution: Foundation & Lifestyle

Both Pilates and physical therapy can be powerful ways to build strength, speed recovery, and prevent future injuries. That’s why Viverant has developed eVolution℠, a distinctive system that combines the best of both to harness outcomes not often achieved independently.

In order to meet your needs, eVolution consists of two distinct phases: Foundation and Lifestyle. Some of the same techniques are utilized in both, but each offers specific goals that are worth noting:

Foundation

  • This is the most likely starting point for most patients, and will be focused on treating injury or chronic issues. 
  • You can refer yourself into the program, or be referred by a physician or Viverant physical therapist.
  • When you begin eVolution, you start with a CoreScore assessment that gives us an idea of how you use your body during everyday tasks and exercises, including how you integrate your glutes, core and trunk muscles.
  • eVolution teaches you how to build deep strength, in a way that’s easy on your joints. You’ll learn how to move more efficiently, with a session that uses your whole body, every time.
  • You are re-assessed every 6 weeks with an eye toward meeting specific outcomes that you and your physical therapist are striving toward.
  • Covered by most insurance plans.

Once you reach a certain assessment score—based on pain level, mobility, and function—you are ready to transition to the next phase, Lifestyle.

Lifestyle

In addition to graduating from Foundation, you can also opt for Lifestyle from the start, as long as you achieve a passing grade on the CoreScore assessment. 

  • Lifestyle is geared toward optimizing performance based on your goals. If you’re an athlete or simply want to function at your ultimate best, Lifestyle will help you move more efficiently, gain strength, and prevent injury.
  • Although Lifestyle isn’t covered by insurance, there are several pricing tiers, including packages, and you won’t run into insurance restrictions such as a cap on the number of sessions you can do.
  • You can do Lifestyle sessions for as long as you want, as often as you want — there’s no “graduating” to a next level, simply a revisit of your goals and outcomes as you progress.

For more information on eVolution, contact us to set up an assessment and consultation.


Oct 13

Getting to the Point: The Anatomy of Dry Needling [Infographic]

Despite its scary-sounding name, “dry needling” is a safe, effective treatment for all types of musculoskeletal pain.
Did y
ou know dry needling can loosen stiff muscles, ease joint pain, and improve oxygen circulation within the body?          
 

Download our infographic to learn how dry needling works and the awesome benefits it offers. 

DOWNLOAD INFOGRAPHIC


Oct 12

You Ran a Marathon, Now What?: Marathon Recovery Tips

From your muscles to your immune system, marathons take a big toll on all different parts of the body.  Some studies show it take around 2 weeks for muscles to return to their normal strength and that the immune system is suppressed up to 3 days after a marathon. Often times runners neglect to take care of their body after running those 26.2 miles, but it should be a critical element of a training program. Failing to follow a post marathon recovery plan can cause performance to suffer and cause overtraining symptoms to kick in.

Keep Moving - Immediately After the Race
Immediately after a race it is important to keep moving. Your body is still in marathon mode even though your mind wants to drop to the ground. Walk around for at 10-15 minutes after the race to help transition your body to a resting state. Drink plenty of water and eat a small amount of carbohydrates and protein, this will help your blood sugar level and repair muscle tissue.

Take a break - Days 1-3
1-3 days after the race it is important to give your body a well-deserved break. Take a hot bath, go on a walk, get a light massage, give your body time to recover. Help repair damaged muscles by eating plenty of carbs and protein, also increase vitamin C intake to help boost your immune system. 

Keep it slow - 1 week
Keep workouts short and light. Incorporate low impact cross-training to increase blood circulation to help with the muscle healing process. Go on a easy effortless run to see how your body responds. If you're still hurting, continue to rest and take it slow.

Moving On - Week 2 and on
If your body feels to be almost back to normal, try easing back into your typical running frequency. However, keep the runs low effort and shorter. It usually takes 2-3 weeks to get back into training as your body recovers and returns to normal. If possible try not to schedule races sooner than 6 weeks after the marathon. 


Oct 04

Why Strength Training Improves Running Performance

Did you know just adding a 20-minute strength training session a couple times a week can improve speed, prevent injury and increase efficiency in runners? Often runners overlook the importance of strength training, whether you are a weekend warrior running 5ks or a seasoned marathon runner strength training is a necessary addition to your training schedule. 

Increased Speed

Contrary to popular belief, lifting and other forms of strength training will not make you bulky. By adding a couple short strength training sessions you will begin to see your running speed increase. To put it simply, the stronger your legs are the more force you can drive into the ground propelling you forward more quickly. You will begin to be able cover more distance in fewer strides increasing speed and efficiency. 

Increased Efficiency

Research shows improved efficiency after adding strength training into runner’s workouts.1 Efficiency is the amount of energy it takes to run a certain distance, lift a specific amount of weight or do any task. The stronger your muscles are the more efficiently they work leading to less oxygen and energy stores needed to perform the task. 

Prevents Injury

The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that almost 70% of runners get injured each year. Shin splints, runner's knee, IT band syndrome and other injuries plague many runners due to lack of strength training. Adding strength training can help strengthen weak areas that lead to these common injuries. Focusing on strengthening the abductors, glutes and core can help prevent many common running injuries. 

If you are interested in learning about ways to incorporate strength training into your running schedule contact Viverant today to get a plan that will meet your individualized needs.


1. Kris Beattie, B. P. (2016). "The Effect of Strength Training on Performance Indicators in Distance Runners." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

 

 

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact Viverant for an appointment before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. Viverant shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site.


Oct 03

eVolution: Pilates and Physical Therapy Evolved

eVolution is an innovative system that combines Pilates and distinctive Physical Therapy skills. Created by Viverant, it helps harness the best of both worlds. Download the guide to learn more about this revolutionary new system that boosts performance, speeds up recovery and more. 


Sep 30

Golf and Core Strength: Drive the Ball Without Pain

Golf has increasingly become about the newest and coolest high technology equipment when the most important piece of equipment, the golfer’s body, is getting ignored. The body must be strong, stable and flexible to produce an efficient and powerful drive. 

Driving puts a large amount of stress on many areas of the body, especially the hips, back, knees and shoulders. Low back pain, in particular, is one of the most common ailments among both recreational and professional golfers. So why is this injury so prevalent in golfers? Lack of core strength. It is one of the biggest factors contributing to low back pain. When most people think of the core, they immediately think of the abdominals, but the core is much more than that. The major core muscles or inner unit of the core includes the transversus abdominis, pelvic floor, multifidi and diaphragm.  These muscles work together to stabilize the pelvis, lumbar spine and rib cage with all movement including golf. 

So what does increasing core strength do for your golf game? Increasing core strength develops stability in the back, helping take off the stress put on the joints during the rotational movements of a swing reducing lower back pain. A strong core also help maintain good posture throughout the golf swing, increasing accuracy and consistent contact with the ball. 

 

Here are 3 core exercises to improve your golf game:

Woodchopper standing or half kneeling

Complete 10-12 repetitions, 2-3 sets

1. Start with left leg forward, holding medicine ball down towards outside of left knee.
    Keep abdominals tight, belly button in line with the medicine ball
2. Stand, raising the medicine ball diagonally up and to the right. Follow the medicine   
    ball movement with your eyes.
3. Repeat now with right leg forward and medicine ball down towards outside of
    right knee.
4. Raise medicine ball diagonally up to the left. Follow the medicine ball movement with
    your eyes.


Prone plank with pelvic drivers

30 seconds in each direction, 2-3 sets

1. Get in a plank position, holding abdominals tight, shoulders above elbows. Drive
    pelvis/hips up to the ceiling and the back to neutral.
2. Repeat, in a plank position and slide pelvis/hips side to side
3. Repeat, in a plank position and slightly dip pelvis/hips right and left


Trunk Rotation on Ball

Complete 8-10 repetitions, 2-3 sets

1. Sit tall on an exercise ball with small ball or towel roll between your knees, with hands
    clasped and arms extended out in front of your chest.
2. Squeeze the ball to stabilize your pelvis.
3. Without letting your pelvis move, rotate arms/shoulders to the right.
4. Rotate to tension, hold 2 breaths and return to center. Repeat to left.
5. Can progress by holding weight or a medicine ball in your hands. 


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